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Supporting the City of Santa Monica's efforts to bring 1,000 EV Chargers to the Community

Drive Clean Santa Monica, co-founded by Kelly Richard Olsen and Paul Scott, is dedicated to making it easier for the tens of thousands of Santa Monicans who live in apartment and condominium buildings to stop driving polluting gas cars and start driving clean, zero-emission electric cars.

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Not having a convenient, reliable way to charge their vehicle is the biggest reason why residents of multi-family buildings in Santa Monica do not drive electric cars.

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Many residents have no parking spot in their building and must park randomly on the street which makes it impossible to install a personal charger.

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Even for those fortunate enough to have assigned parking in their condo or apartment complex, the age of the building’s electrical system often makes the installation of an EV charger cost prohibitive.

To make it easier for residents in multi-family neighborhoods to drive EVs, the Santa Monica City Council adopted the Santa Monica Electric Vehicle Action Plan, which includes Drive Clean Santa Monica’s policy recommendations to have 300 public chargers installed and operating by November, 2019 and 1,000 chargers by November, 2024.

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When these chargers are in place, thousands of Santa Monica residents will be able to switch from a gas car to an EV and conveniently charge in their own neighborhood!

Making Santa Monica the most EV friendly city in the country and getting more residents into EVs will make a huge difference in the air quality of our community and the region.

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Why is the EV Action plan such an important step in making Santa Monica a healthier place to live? The number one source of air pollution and greenhouse gas in our city is generated by gasoline-powered passenger vehicles.

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These are sobering statistics, but we can change them!

 

By switching from a gas-powered vehicle to an EV, you not only help save lives, you help save the environment, too.

 

100% electric cars have no tailpipe and therefore no tailpipe pollution. In addition, Santa Monica's EV chargers are powered with green electricity, providing 100% renewable electricity to your car’s battery.

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Want to see how much of a difference you can make in cleaning up the air in your neighborhood by driving an EV instead of of a gas car?

 

Simply click this link, enter your zip code, the make, model and the year of any EV, and it will compare it to the pollution generated by a gas-powered car.

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What about the overall impacts on the environment of an EV?  Watch this short video made by the Union of Concerned Scientists about the environmental life cycle of a gas car compared to an EV.

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Supporting the City of Santa Monica's efforts to bring 1,000 EV Chargers to the Community

Drive Clean Santa Monica, co-founded by Kelly Richard Olsen and Paul Scott, is dedicated to making it easier for the tens of thousands of Santa Monicans who live in apartment and condominium buildings to stop driving polluting gas cars and start driving clean, zero-emission electric cars.

Paul Scott gives advice at the Drive Clean Santa Monica booth during Climate Fest 2018

Not having a convenient, reliable way to charge their vehicles is the biggest reason why residents of multi-family buildings in Santa Monica do not drive electric cars.

Drive Clean Santa Monica advocates for a network of EV chargers in Santa Monica.

Many residents have no parking spot in their building and must park randomly on the street which makes it impossible to install a personal charger.

Drive Clean Santa Monica recognizes that many EV drivers in Santa Monica live in mult-family districts without easy access to chargers.
Many EV drivers in Santa Monica cannot install home chargers because of old or outdated electrical systems.

Even for those fortunate enough to have assigned parking in their condo or apartment complex, the age of the building’s electrical system often makes the installation of an EV charger cost prohibitive.

To make it easier for residents in multi-family neighborhoods to drive EVs, the Santa Monica City Council adopted the Santa Monica Electric Vehicle Action Plan, which includes Drive Clean Santa Monica’s policy recommendations to have 300 public chargers installed and operating by November, 2019 and 1,000 chargers by November, 2024.

The Santa Monica Electric Vehicle Action Plan was created with valuable input fro Drive Clean Santa Monica board members.

When these chargers are in place, thousands of Santa Monica residents will be able to switch from a gas car to an EV and conveniently charge in their own neighborhood!

Making Santa Monica the most EV friendly city in the country and getting more residents into EVs will make a huge difference in the air quality of our community and the region.

Santa Monica residents will be able to easily charge their EVs once the 1,000 chargers are online.

Why is the EV Action Plan such an important step in making Santa Monica a healthier place to live? The number one source of air pollution and greenhouse gas in our city is generated by gasoline-powered passenger vehicles.

Drive Clean Santa Monica is pushing for more EV chargers in the city to help end dependence on gas-powered vehicles.
Air pollution kills 9,200 Californians per year - one of the reasons why Drive Clean Santa Monica is working to make it easier to drive an EV in Santa Monica.
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These are sobering statistics, but we can change them!

 

By switching from a gas-powered vehicle to an EV, you not only help save lives, you help save the environment, too.

 

100% electric cars have no tailpipe and therefore no tailpipe pollution. In addition, Santa Monica's EV chargers are powered with green electricity, providing 100% renewable electricity to your car’s battery.

Charging your electric vehicle in Santa Monica is environmentally responsible, since the city's chargers are powered by 100% renewable energy.

What are the overall impacts on the environment of an EV?  Watch this short video made by the Union of Concerned Scientists about the environmental life cycle of a gas car compared to an electric vehicle.

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More Reasons to Switch to an Electric Vechicle

Besides never needing expensive, polluting gasoline, 100% electric vehicles do not require oil changes, tune-ups, transmission jobs or smog checks. 

Rotating the tires is usually the only maintenance a typical EV needs.

100% electric vehicles are good for the environment, fun to drive, quiet, AND they save you time and money!

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Let Drive Clean Santa Monica Help You Join The EV Revolution

Have questions about EV driving or would like to be kept up-to-date with the latest EV charging news and charger locations?

Just click on the link below to send us an email with your questions or a request to be put on our mailing list.

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Drive Clean Santa Monica Leadership

Drive Clean Santa Monica is made up of EV experts, environmental activists, former Santa Monica elected and appointed officials, doctors, scientists, and municipal fleet supervisors who have over 100 years of experience in the field of electric transportation and renewable energy. Drive Clean Santa Monica’s Director and each member of the Executive Board of Advisors drives a plug in vehicle.

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Kelly Richard Olsen is a co-founder of Drive Clean Santa Monica and serves as the Director of the organization.

Kelly has a long history of environmental activism and government involvement.

 

He is a former Santa Monica City Councilman and a Santa Monica Planning Commissioner, serving two terms as the Chairman of the Commission.

 

As a City Councilman, Kelly initiated numerous environmental programs, including Santa Monica's Alternative Fueled Vehicle Policy, which has resulted in Santa Monica being a recognized leader in EV programs and infrastructure.

 

Kelly has been driving a 100% electric car for many years while residing in a multi-family building without onsite parking and no ability to charge his car at home. Kelly has had to rely entirely on public charging opportunities and knows firsthand how challenging this can be.

 

Understanding that the lack of convenient charging was the most cited reason residents in multi-family buildings were not adopting EVs at a higher rate, Kelly, along with Paul Scott and Drive Clean Santa Monica’s Executive Advisory Boardmembers, developed policies and goals which would make it easier for gas vehicle drivers to make the transition to zero emission electric cars.

 

On November 14, 2017, the Santa Monica City Council adopted the Santa Monica EV Action Plan, which incorporated the goals and policies proposed by Drive Clean Santa Monica.

Executive Board of Advisors

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Paul Scott is a co-founder and Senior Member of Drive Clean Santa Monica’s Board of Advisors.

 

Paul is also a member of the City of Santa Monica’s Task Force on the Environment EV Subcommittee, which makes EV policy and infrastructure recommendations to the Santa Monica City Council for adoption.

 

He was a founding Boardmember of the world’s largest non-profit EV advocacy organization, Plug In America, and is recognized as a leading authority on EVs and renewable energy.

 

Along with Drive Clean Santa Monica Advisory Boardmembers Alexandra Paul and Linda Nicholes, Paul created Dontcrush.com, Plug In America’s predecessor, which was successful in stopping Toyota from crushing the RAV 4 EVs and negotiating a deal where the drivers were allowed to buy out their leases and keep the cars on the road.

 

Paul was also featured with Alexandra Paul and Linda Nicholes in the 2006 documentary, Who Killed the Electric Car? and was a consultant for the follow-up film, Revenge of the Electric Car.

 

Paul has appeared on television and radio and written numerous articles and opinion columns about the importance of EVs and the use of renewable energy to reduce America’s dependence on petroleum, boost America's economy and improve the global environment and is in constant demand to speak at environmental conferences around the world.

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Judy Abdo is the current Chairperson of the City of Santa Monica’s Task Force on the Environment EV Subcommittee, which makes EV policy and infrastructure recommendations to the Task Force and the Santa Monica City Council for adoption.

 

Judy is a former Santa Monica City Councilmember and served two terms as Santa Monica’s Mayor.

 

As Mayor, Judy initiated the Santa Monica Task Force on the Environment and championed numerous environmental programs and policies.

 

She served as Chair of the Santa Monica City Urban Forest Task Force and also has been Santa Monica’s representative to the Metropolitan Water District since 1996.

 

Judy also serves as the Chairperson of the Santa Monica Pier Corporation and is a member of the steering committee of Climate Action Santa Monica.

 

She was appointed to the First Five LA Commission Board by LA County Supervisor Sheila Kuehl and is currently Vice-Chair of the Board.

 

Judy was a founder of Sojourn Shelter for battered women and children, a founder of the Santa Monica AIDS Project and is a founder and Co-Chair of Santa Monica Forward, a community based organization which advocates for civil discourse and civic engagement in a broad range of issues.

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Alexandra Paul is a founding Boardmember of the world’s largest non-profit EV advocacy organization, Plug In America.

 

Alexandra comes to the electric car world due to her concern about the environment. Alexandra bought her first electric car, a converted Datsun, in 1990, spurred on by the Exxon Valdez oil spill.

 

In 1997, the United Nations Population Fund honored her for her speaking tour on human overpopulation.

 

Global Green awarded her its 1999 Hollywood Leadership Award for her environmental work.

 

Alexandra was the ACLU of Southern California’s 2005 Activist of the Year for her peace and environmental advocacy, and Last Chance for Animals' 2014 Vegan of the Year. 

 

As depicted in the documentary, Who Killed the Electric Car?, Alexandra participated in a 28-day vigil to protest the crushing of GM’s EV1, which resulted in her being arrested on General Motors property in Burbank California for blocking a truck loaded with EV1s which were being taken to a crushing facility.

 

In 2011, General Motors asked Alexandra to be a spokesperson for the Chevy Volt.

 

Alexandra continues her work as an environmental activist as well as a staunch fighter for animal rights.

 

Alexandra Paul is also an actress who has appeared in over 100 film and television projects, including the hit TV series, Baywatch.  

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Linda Nicholes is a founding Boardmember and former President of the world’s largest non-profit EV advocacy organization, Plug In America.

 

Her efforts to save the GM EV1 and her successful efforts to save the Toyota RAV 4 EV from being destroyed were featured in the film documentaries, Who Killed the Electric Car? and What is the Electric Car?

 

Linda and her husband were the first residents in the City of Anaheim to install a roof-top solar system to power their home and her electric car in the year 2000.  

 

Linda is also involved in numerous environmental issues.

 

She is on the advisory board of Ocean Defender’s Alliance, an effective ocean-going organization that removes thousands of pounds of deadly, abandoned traps and fishing lines from our oceans which entangles whales, seal lions, porpoises and other sea creatures.

 

Linda also works closely with Defenders of Wildlife, with a special interest in helping to protect beautiful, persecuted animals like wolves and grizzlies.

 

Linda continues to be active is the EV movement and takes her Tesla to numerous environmental and EV events to give test rides and spread the world about the benefits of renewable energy and driving electric.

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David Reichmuth, Ph.D. is a Senior Engineer with the Union of Concerned Scientists Clean Vehicles Program focusing on oil savings and vehicle electrification.

 

Dr. Reichmuth is a co-author of the definitive comparison of the carbon footprint of gas vehicles vs. electric vehicles, Cleaner Vehicles from Cradle to Grave, which proved conclusively that EVs are far cleaner than gasoline cars.

Before coming to Union of Concerned Scientists, Dr. Reichmuth worked for Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, California, where he modeled the potential costs and benefits of the large-scale adoption of battery electric, hydrogen fuel cell electric, and improved petroleum-fueled vehicles.

 

His peer-reviewed publications compared the value of these different vehicles under a range of technology and policy assumptions.

Dr. Reichmuth also served as U.S. representative at meetings of the International Energy Agency’s hydrogen analysis experts group and worked with a major U.S. manufacturing company to assess the technical and economic potential of the ethanol biofuel production industry.

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Paul Rosenstein has been active in Santa Monica for 40 years.

 

Paul is a former Santa Monica Mayor and Chairman of the Santa Monica Planning Commission and served as a member of the non-profit organization, the Santa Monica Pier Restoration Corporation.

 

During his tenure in City Hall, Paul was a strong supporter of environmental and sustainable policies and he continues to advise the City Council on electric vehicle policy.

 

Paul, who was a was a journeyman electrician, also has a long history of supporting workers rights.

 

Paul served as the Political Director of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 11, a National Field Rep for the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations, as well as the National Coordinator of the Coalition of Kaiser Permanente Unions.

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Benjamin Kay is a scientist and instructor of Life and Environmental sciences at Santa Monica High School and Santa Monica College and has spent 13 years creating an immersive sustainability experience for his students modeled after his lifestyle. 

 

After intensive examination of the causes and effects of human impacts to aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, his students actively pursue viable solutions at the school and/or community levels. 

 

Ben also co-founded Team Marine with his students in 2006, an environmental science teen action group that spearheads diverse research, service learning, and educational outreach initiatives. 

 

Through a myriad of experiences in field, laboratory, and community settings, students bolster their academic resumes with scholarships and awards, gain technical training for jobs in the green economy, and form deeper connections with nature. 

 

Examples of student projects include converting a gas car into an electric vehicle, building solar boats, showcasing eco-artwork, monitoring ocean water quality and helping ban single-use plastics at the City and State levels. 

 

Beyond the classroom and research, Benjamin serves on the Clean Beaches and Ocean Parcel Tax Committee for the City of Santa Monica.

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Darrell Clarke is a former Chairman of the Santa Monica Planning Commission.

 

Darrell leads the Sierra Club’s Healthy Communities and Transportation team in the National Clean Transportation For All Campaign, which has a goal of 50% reduction of U.S. oil use by 2030.

 

Locally, he is the Sierra’s Club’s Angeles Chapter Transportation Chair and a Conservation Management Committee member, the National Co-lead of the Sierra Club’s Beyond Oil campaign as well as the Team Manager of the Sierra Club’s Electric Vehicle Campaign.

 

He is also chair of Los Angeles Metro’s Citizens Advisory Council and a member of Move LA’s leadership board and was a founder and Co-Chair of Friends 4 Expo Transit, which won approval of the Expo Line light rail from downtown L.A. to Santa Monica.

 

Darrell was honored by MoveLA for his tireless efforts as a leader and activist to make the new LA Metro Expo Line possible.

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Dr. Marc Futernick is the Medical Director of the Emergency Department at California Hospital Medical Center.

 

Dr. Futernick is also the current Chairman of the Board of Valley Emergency Physicians and serves on the board of the California Hospital Medical Center Foundation.

 

Seeing first hand on a day-to-day basis the serious health impacts of air pollution caused by gas and diesel vehicles, Dr. Futernick is a part of the American Lung Association in California Doctors for Climate Health campaign which highlights the medical community's strong support for California's leadership on clean air and climate policies.

 

Dr. Futernick has authored numerous papers and is requested to speak at medical conferences around the world.

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Rick Sikes served 10 years as the City of Santa Monica’s Fleet Superintendent.

 

Rick brought to life Santa Monica’s Alternative Fueled Vehicle Policy by converting and purchasing vehicles which could run on a variety of non-gas fuels such as Biodiesel, LNG, CNG and electricity.

 

Rick increased the percentage of alternative fuel vehicles in the City’s fleet to 76%, significantly reducing tailpipe and greenhouse gas emissions stemming from City operated vehicles.

Rick expanded the City’s use of electric vehicles and charging infrastructure for charging the City’s EV fleet, while at the same aggressively planning and supervising a network of EV chargers for the residents and visitors of Santa Monica.

 

Currently, Rick works with CarbonBLU, a company which puts high-end analytic information in the hands of fleet managers, allowing them to benefit from the wide range of emission reduction technologies, as well as funding opportunities which are available for fleet sustainability.

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Rick Teebay is a Fleet and Transportation Specialist and the Program Manager in the Office of Sustainability of the County of Los Angeles.

 

Rick is part of the County's team responsible for the development and implementation of the Los Angeles County's Municipal Climate Action Plan.

 

As the County Fleet Manager, he oversaw the installation of EV infrastructure at over 20 County sites.

 

Rick has worked closely with the California Air Resources Board, the California Energy Commission and the South Coast Air Quality Management District in the development and implementation of numerous programs, rules, and regulations.

 

Rick was a founding member of the SoCal EV Collaborative, Co-chair of the Southern California Association of Governments' Plug-In Electric Vehicle Coordinating Council, and a member of the Los Angeles Economic Development Corporation's e-Mobility Task Force.

 

He is also a member of the National Association of Fleet Administrators and past Chair of its Fuels and Technology Committee.

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